( Film ) old boy

10 Feb

oldboy is a 2003 South Korean film directed by Park Chan-wook. It is based on the Japanese manga of the same name written by Nobuaki Minegishi and Garon Tsuchiya. Oldboy is the second installment of The Vengeance Trilogy, preceded by Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance and followed by Sympathy for Lady Vengeance.

The film follows the story of one Oh Dae-Su, who is locked in a hotel room for 15 years without knowing his captor’s motives. When he is finally released, Dae Su finds himself still trapped in a web of conspiracy and violence. His own quest for vengeance becomes tied in with romance when he falls for an attractive sushi chef.

The film won the Grand Prix at the 2004 Cannes Film Festval and high praise from the President of the Jury, director Quentin Tarantino. Critically, the movie has been well received in the United States, with an 80% “Certified Fresh” rating at Rotten Tomatoes. Film critic Roger Ebert has claimed Oldboy to be a “…powerful film not because of what it depicts, but because of the depths of the human heart which it strips bare”. In 2008, voters on CNN named it one of the ten best Asian films ever made.

Plot

Korean businessman Oh Dae-su is bailed out from a local police station by his close friend Joo-Hwan after a drunken fight, on the night of Dae-su’s daughter’s birthday. Dae-su calls her on a public phone, but as Joo-Hwan takes the phone, Dae-su disappears. Kidnapped and confined to a shabby room with no explanation, Dae-su is not allowed any contact and is fed only fried dumplings through a narrow slot. Experiencing hallucinations, his attempts at suicide are prevented by being gassed into unconsciousness. Thus he keeps himself fit and occupied with shadowboxing; hardening his knuckles by punching the wall. While watching television, he discovers that his wife has been murdered, his daughter sent to foster parents and that he himself is the prime suspect.

Dae-su is suddenly set free on the rooftop of a building 15 years after his imprisonment began, with a new suit. Dae-su is given a cellphone by a stranger and goes to a local restaurant, where he meets young chef Mi-do (Kang Hye-jeong), who brings him to her home. Dae-su realises he is being tracked through phone calls from his unidentified captor and instant messaging on Mi-do’s computer. Dae-su locates the restaurant that provided the fried dumplings during his imprisonment, and subsequently the building he was held captive in, torturing the warden for information. He finds tape recordings of his captor that reveal little. He then fights his way out past numerous goons, suffering a knife wound to his back. Collapsing on the street, a stranger places him in a taxi, only to direct him to Mi-do’s address and identify Dae-su by name.

The man, named Woo-jin (Yu Ji-tae), reveals himself as Dae-su’s kidnapper and tells him that Dae-su must discover his motives. Mi-do will die if he fails, but if he succeeds, Woo-jin will kill himself. Later, Dae-su and Mi-do grow emotionally closer together and have sex. Dae-su discovers he and Woo-jin briefly attended the same high school and remembers spying on Woo-jin’s incestuous relationship with his sister, Soo-ah (Yun Jin-seo). Dae-su, unaware of their familial relationship, inadvertently spread the rumor before transferring to another school in Seoul. Soo-ah’s mental turmoil grew, causing physical signs of pregnancy and her eventual suicide. During the investigation, Woo-jin kills Joo-Hwan for insulting Soo-ah, enraging Dae-su further.

Dae-su confronts Woo-jin at his penthouse with the information but instead Woo-jin gives Dae-su a photo album. As Dae-su flips through the album, he witnesses his daughter grow older in the pictures, until discovering that Mi-do is actually his daughter. Woo-jin reveals that the events surrounding Dae-su were orchestrated to cause Dae-su and Mi-do to commit incest. It is also revealed that hypnosis and post-hypnotic suggestion were involved with Dae-su’s imprisonment, and had been performed on Mi-do as well. A horrified Dae-su begs Woo-jin to conceal the secret from Mi-do, groveling for forgiveness before slicing out his own tongue and offering it to Woo-jin as a symbol of his silence. Woo-jin agrees to spare Mi-do from the knowledge and leaves Dae-su in his penthouse. As he rides alone in the elevator, he is struck by the vivid memory of his sister’s death, in which he was complicit, and shoots himself in the head.

Dae-su sits in a winter landscape, where he makes a deal with the same hypnotist who conditioned him during his imprisonment, asking for her help to allow him to forget the secret. She reads his pleas from a handwritten letter and, touched by his words, begins the hypnosis process, lulling him into unconsciousness. Hours later, Dae-su wakes up, the hypnotist gone, and stumbles about before finally meeting with Mi-do. They embrace, and Mi-do tells Dae-su that she loves him, though whether Dae-su knows the secret is uncertain.

Cast

  • Choi Min-sik as Oh Dae-su: The film’s protagonist, who has been imprisoned for somewhere around 15 years. Choi Min-sik lost and gained weight for his role depending on the filming schedule, trained for six weeks and did most of his stunt work.
  • Yu Ji-tae as Lee Woo-jin: The man behind Oh Dae-su’s imprisonment. Park Chan-wook’s ideal choice for Woo-jin had been actor Han Suk-kyu, who previously played a rival to Choi Min-sik in Shiri and No. 3. Choi then suggested Yu Ji-tae for the role, despite Park’s reservation about his youthful age.
  • Kang Hye-jeong as Mi-do: Dae-su’s love interest.
  • Ji Dae-han as No Joo-hwan: Dae-su’s friend and the owner of a cybercafe.
  • Kim Byeong-ok as Mr. Han: Bodyguard of Woo-jin.
  • Oh Tae-kyung as Young Dae-su.
  • Ahn Yeon-suk as Young Woo-jin.
  • Oo Il-han as Young Joo-hwan.
  • Yun Jin-seo as Lee Soo-ah: Woo-jin’s sister.
  • Oh Dal-su as Park Cheol-woong: The private prison’s manager

source:-  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oldboy

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